Gross Domestic Income - GDI

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DEFINITION of 'Gross Domestic Income - GDI'

The sum of all income earned while producing goods and services within a nation's borders. Gross domestic income (GDI) is a lesser-known calculation stat used by the Federal Reserve to gauge economic activity based on income. It differs from gross domestic product (GDP), which gauges economic activity on expenditure.

GDI is calculated as the total income payable in GDP income accounts. It can be calculated in two ways:

1. GDI = compensation of employees + gross operating surplus + gross mixed income + taxes – subsidies on production and imports

Compensation of employees encompasses the total compensation to employees for services rendered. Gross operating surplus, also known as profits, refers to the surpluses of incorporated businesses. Gross mixed income is the same as gross operating surplus, but for unincorporated businesses.

2. GDI = rental income + interest income + profits + wages + statistical adjustments

Statistical adjustments may include corporate income tax, dividends and undistributed profits.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Gross Domestic Income - GDI'

Theoretically, GDI should equal GDP; however, because GDP is calculated based on expenditure accounts, a difference usually exists. The market value of goods and services consumed often differs, because of measurement errors, from the amount of income earned to produce them.

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