GDP Price Deflator

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DEFINITION of 'GDP Price Deflator'

An economic metric that accounts for inflation by converting output measured at current prices into constant-dollar GDP. The GDP deflator shows how much a change in the base year's GDP relies upon changes in the price level. Also known as the "GDP implicit price deflator."

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'GDP Price Deflator'

Because it isn't based on a fixed basket of goods and services, the GDP deflator has an advantage over the Consumer Price Index. Changes in consumption patterns or the introduction of new goods and services are automatically reflected in the deflator.

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