Gen-Saki

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DEFINITION of 'Gen-Saki'

A secondary market in Japan, also known as a repo market for its similarity to repurchase agreements. It is a medium for government bonds, in the Japanese market only, to be reissued and resold at the new rate. Gen-Saki is available to both corporations and financial institutions.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Gen-Saki'

When setting the Gen-Saki rate, the yen London interbank offered rate is heavily considered as it accurately reflects the deposit market rate.

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