General Agreements To Borrow - GAB

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DEFINITION of 'General Agreements To Borrow - GAB'

A borrowing/lending medium for members of the Group of Ten. Members of the lending country deposit funds into the International Monetary Fund (IMF), which are made available to be withdrawn by the borrowing member in need. One of the advantages of this is that each country deals in their own currency, leaving all conversions to the IMF.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'General Agreements To Borrow - GAB'

The Group of Ten is comprised of Japan, France, Germany, Sweden, The United Kingdom, Japan, Italy, Belgium, the Netherlands, the United States and Canada. Switzerland is the most recent member. They meet yearly to discuss political, financial and economic situations.

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