General And Administrative Expense - G&A

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DEFINITION of 'General And Administrative Expense - G&A'

Expenditures related to the day-to-day operations of a business. General and administrative expenses pertain to operation expenses rather that to expenses that can be directly related to the production of any goods or services. General and administrative expenses include rent, utilities, insurance and managerial salaries.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'General And Administrative Expense - G&A'

General and administrative expenses encompass a variety of expenses associated with performing the daily operations in a company. In the company's income statement, these expenses with generally appear under operating expenses. Legal expenses, other professional expenses and executive salaries may also be included.

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