General Examination

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DEFINITION

A regulatory measure set up to give a detailed examination of all aspects of a bank. The examination is conducted by the governing body of different levels of banks. For example, the state banking regulators would provide an overview of all state-run banking institutions.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS

This examination is generally conducted every two years. The person/persons conducting the exam will take an in-depth look focusing a lot of time on the banks financial statements, and interviewing staff and managers on policies and procedures. They are looking for descrepancies, as well as the overall health of the financial institution.


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