General Depreciation System - GDS


DEFINITION of 'General Depreciation System - GDS'

The most commonly used modified accelerated cost recovery system (MACRS) for calculating depreciation. A general depreciation system uses the declining-balance method to depreciate personal property.

BREAKING DOWN 'General Depreciation System - GDS'

The declining-balance method involves applying the depreciation rate against the
non-depreciated balance. For example, if an asset that costs $1,000 is depreciated at 25% each year, the deduction is $250.00 in the first year and $187.50 in the second year, and so forth.

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