Geographical Labor Mobility

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DEFINITION of 'Geographical Labor Mobility'

This refers to the level of freedom that workers have to relocate in order to find gainful employment that reflects their training and occupational interests. Embracing this concept, which is most commonly encountered within the European Union (EU), seeks to ensure individual, corporate, and national economic growth by helping qualified workers easily cross state and national boundaries to find "best fit" employment.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Geographical Labor Mobility'

While many North Americans enjoy a high level of geographical labor mobility within their own country, the immigration debate, the war on drugs and post-9/11 border restrictions have noticeably decreased labor mobility across national borders. In an effort to revitalize geographical labor mobility with its neighbors, U.S. lawmakers continue to refine mobility opportunities for trusted workers.

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