Gharar

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Gharar'

An Islamic finance term describing a risky or hazardous sale, where details concerning the sale item are unknown or uncertain. Gharar is generally prohibited under Islam, which explicitly forbids trades that are considered to have excessive risk due to uncertainty.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Gharar'

There are strict rules in Islamic finance against transactions that are highly uncertain or may cause any injustice or deceit against any of the parties.

In finance, gharar is observed within derivative transactions, such as forwards, futures and options, in short selling, and in speculation. In Islamic finance, most derivative contracts are forbidden and considered invalid because of the uncertainty involved in the future delivery of the underlying asset.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Murabaha

    An Islamic financing structure, where an intermediary buys a ...
  2. Option

    A financial derivative that represents a contract sold by one ...
  3. Islamic Banking

    A banking system that is based on the principles of Islamic law ...
  4. Pre-Settlement Risk

    The risk that one party of a contract will fail to meet the terms ...
  5. Riba

    A concept in Islamic banking that refers to charged interest. ...
  6. Futures Contract

    A contractual agreement, generally made on the trading floor ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. What is an Islamic investment policy?

    Islamic investments are a unique form of socially responsible investments because Islam makes no division between the spiritual ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. Why would a company issue a rights offering?

    Companies most commonly issue a rights offering to raise additional capital. A company may need extra capital to meet its ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. What is the difference between share purchase rights and options?

    There is a big difference between share purchase rights and options. With share purchase rights, the holder may or may not ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. How do I calculate a forward rate in Excel?

    You need to have the zero-coupon yield curve information to calculate forward rates, even in Microsoft Excel. Once the spot ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What is the difference between an option-adjusted spread and a Z-spread in reference ...

    Unlike the Z-spread calculation, the option-adjusted spread takes into account how the embedded option in a bond can change ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. In what ways can a sinking fund affect bond returns?

    The effective yield of a bond sinking fund to an investor should not be considered similar to a bond nonsinking fund. Both ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Options & Futures

    An Introduction To Structured Products

    Learn a simple way to bring the benefits of derivatives into your portfolio.
  2. Active Trading

    Commodities: The Portfolio Hedge

    These diverse asset classes can provide downside protection and upside potential. Find out how to use them.
  3. Retirement

    Working With Islamic Finance

    There is no division between the spiritual and the secular in this type of socially responsible investing.
  4. Insurance

    Futures Fundamentals

    For those who are new to futures but want a solid understanding of them, this tutorial explains what futures contracts are, how they work and why investors use them.
  5. Fundamental Analysis

    Calculating Future Value

    Future value is the value of an asset or cash at a specified date in the future that is equivalent in value to a specified sum today.
  6. Economics

    What is Deadweight Loss?

    Mainly used in economics, deadweight loss can be applied to any deficiency caused by an inefficient allocation of resources.
  7. Economics

    How to Do a Cost-Benefit Analysis

    The benefits of a given situation or business-related action are summed and then the costs associated with taking that action are subtracted.
  8. Fundamental Analysis

    Calculating the Herfindahl-Hirschman Index (HHI)

    The Herfindhal-Hirschman Index, (HHI) is a measure of market concentration and competition among market participants.
  9. Investing Basics

    Understanding Non-Deliverable Forward (NDF)

    A foreign exchange hedging strategy where the parties agree to settle the profit or loss in a foreign currency futures contract before the expiration date.
  10. Investing

    What More Volatility Means For Momentum Stocks

    One byproduct of the recent tick higher in bond yields: a meaningful rise in volatility for both stocks and bonds.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Unlevered Beta

    A type of metric that compares the risk of an unlevered company to the risk of the market. The unlevered beta is the beta ...
  2. Moving Average - MA

    A widely used indicator in technical analysis that helps smooth out price action by filtering out the “noise” from random ...
  3. Yield Curve

    A line that plots the interest rates, at a set point in time, of bonds having equal credit quality, but differing maturity ...
  4. Productivity

    An economic measure of output per unit of input. Inputs include labor and capital, while output is typically measured in ...
  5. Variance

    The spread between numbers in a data set, measuring Variance is calculated by taking the differences between each number ...
  6. Terminal Value - TV

    The value of a bond at maturity, or of an asset at a specified, future valuation date, taking into account factors such as ...
Trading Center