Gift Causa Mortis


DEFINITION of 'Gift Causa Mortis'

A gift to be given at a later date in anticipation of the giver's death. If the giver dies of an ailment differing from the expected one, the gift is not effective. The gift may be revoked by the giver on any date prior to the expected date as long as no property, whether concrete or symbolic, has been delivered to the recipient.

BREAKING DOWN 'Gift Causa Mortis'

A gift can be given causa mortis (in anticipation of the death of the grantor) or inter vivos (during the life of the grantor). A gift causa mortis is taxed under federal estate tax law in the same way as a gift bequeathed by a will.

  1. Taxes

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  3. Gift Tax Return

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  4. Gift Inter Vivos

    A gift given during the life of the grantor. Following a gift ...
  5. Gift

    Property, money or assets that one person transfers to another ...
  6. Estate

    All of the valuable things an individual owns, such as real estate, ...
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