Global Crossing


DEFINITION of 'Global Crossing'

A communication services company that filed for bankruptcy protection amid an accounting scandal where it had allegedly inflated earnings by using capacity swaps, among other things. Capacity swaps are the exchange of telecommunications capacity between carriers that is booked as revenue without money ever being exchanged.

BREAKING DOWN 'Global Crossing'

This scandal happened around the same time as the Enron transgression. In early 2002, the Global Crossing bankruptcy was the fourth largest in U.S. history. In 2005, it settled with the SEC, having been determined that it did not comply with numerous accounting laws and is to refrain from violating any other accounting laws.

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  1. Do dividends affect working capital?

    Regardless of whether cash dividends are paid or accrued, a company's working capital is reduced. When cash dividends are ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. Do prepayments provide working capital?

    Prepayments, or prepaid expenses, are typically included in the current assets on a company's balance sheet, as they represent ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. Does working capital include salaries?

    A company accrues unpaid salaries on its balance sheet as part of accounts payable, which is a current liability account, ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What is a profit and loss (P&L) statement and why do companies publish them?

    A profit and loss (P&L) statement, or balance sheet, is essentially a snapshot of a company's financial activity for ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. How do dividends affect the balance sheet?

    Dividends paid in cash affect a company's balance sheet by decreasing the company's cash account on the asset side and decreasing ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. Are dividends considered an expense?

    Cash or stock dividends distributed to shareholders are not considered an expense on a company's income statement. Stock ... Read Full Answer >>

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