Global Crossing


DEFINITION of 'Global Crossing'

A communication services company that filed for bankruptcy protection amid an accounting scandal where it had allegedly inflated earnings by using capacity swaps, among other things. Capacity swaps are the exchange of telecommunications capacity between carriers that is booked as revenue without money ever being exchanged.

BREAKING DOWN 'Global Crossing'

This scandal happened around the same time as the Enron transgression. In early 2002, the Global Crossing bankruptcy was the fourth largest in U.S. history. In 2005, it settled with the SEC, having been determined that it did not comply with numerous accounting laws and is to refrain from violating any other accounting laws.

  1. Reorganization

    A process designed to revive a financially troubled or bankrupt ...
  2. Enron

    A U.S. energy-trading and utilities company that housed one of ...
  3. Chapter 11

    Named after the U.S. bankruptcy code 11, Chapter 11 is a form ...
  4. Bankruptcy

    A legal proceeding involving a person or business that is unable ...
  5. Accountant

    A professional who performs accounting functions such as audits ...
  6. Swap

    A derivative contract through which two parties exchange financial ...
Related Articles
  1. Personal Finance

    Top 8 Ways Companies Cook The Books

    Find out more about the fraudulent accounting methods some companies use to fool investors.
  2. Investing

    The Biggest Stock Scams Of All Time

    Where there is money, there are swindlers. Protect yourself by learning how investors have been betrayed in the past.
  3. Markets

    Are Your Stocks Doomed?

    When a company is headed for trouble, the warning signs are usually there. Learn how to spot disaster.
  4. Options & Futures

    Business Owners: Avoid Enron-esque Retirement Plans

    If your business administers a retirement plan, you should recognize what's at stake.
  5. Investing

    A Case Study: Earnings Manipulation And The Role Of The Media

    Here we explore why the media focuses on certain earnings manipulation cases in post-Enron Wall Street.
  6. Professionals

    4 Must Watch Films and Documentaries for Accountants

    Learn how these must-watch movies for accountants teach about the importance of ethics in a world driven by greed and financial power.
  7. Active Trading

    An Introduction To Depreciation

    Companies make choices and assumptions in calculating depreciation, and you need to know how these affect the bottom line.
  8. Fundamental Analysis

    Using Decision Trees In Finance

    A decision tree provides a comprehensive framework to review the alternative scenarios and consequences a decision may lead to.
  9. Bonds & Fixed Income

    Credit Default Swaps: An Introduction

    This derivative can help manage portfolio risk, but it isn't a simple vehicle.
  10. Retirement

    What Was The Glass-Steagall Act?

    Established in 1933 and repealed in 1999, the Glass-Steagall Act had good intentions but mixed results.
  1. Can working capital be depreciated?

    Working capital as current assets cannot be depreciated the way long-term, fixed assets are. In accounting, depreciation ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. Do working capital funds expire?

    While working capital funds do not expire, the working capital figure does change over time. This is because it is calculated ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. How much working capital does a small business need?

    The amount of working capital a small business needs to run smoothly depends largely on the type of business, its operating ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What does high working capital say about a company's financial prospects?

    If a company has high working capital, it has more than enough liquid funds to meet its short-term obligations. Working capital, ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. How can working capital affect a company's finances?

    Working capital, or total current assets minus total current liabilities, can affect a company's longer-term investment effectiveness ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What can working capital be used for?

    Working capital is used to cover all of a company's short-term expenses, including inventory, payments on short-term debt ... Read Full Answer >>

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Turkey

    Slang for an investment that yields disappointing results or turns out worse than expected. Failed business deals, securities ...
  2. Barefoot Pilgrim

    A slang term for an unsophisticated investor who loses all of his or her wealth by trading equities in the stock market. ...
  3. Quick Ratio

    The quick ratio is an indicator of a company’s short-term liquidity. The quick ratio measures a company’s ability to meet ...
  4. Black Tuesday

    October 29, 1929, when the DJIA fell 12% - one of the largest one-day drops in stock market history. More than 16 million ...
  5. Black Monday

    October 19, 1987, when the Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJIA) lost almost 22% in a single day. That event marked the beginning ...
  6. Monetary Policy

    Monetary policy is the actions of a central bank, currency board or other regulatory committee that determine the size and ...
Trading Center