Glocalization

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DEFINITION of 'Glocalization'

A combination of the words "globalization" and "localization" used to describe a product or service that is developed and distributed globally, but is also fashioned to accommodate the user or consumer in a local market. This means that the product or service may be tailored to conform with local laws, customs or consumer preferences. Products or services that are effectively "glocalized" are, by definition, going to be of much greater interest to the end user.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Glocalization'

Yahoo! is an example of a company that practices glocalization. It markets a portal that is viewed worldwide and offers different versions of its website (and related services) for different users. For example, it provides content and language variations in some 25 countries including China, Russia and Canada. It also customizes content to appeal to individuals in those locations.

A number of both public and private companies currently practice glocalization in an effort to build their customer bases and grow revenues.

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