Gross Margin Return On Investment - GMROI

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What is a 'Gross Margin Return On Investment - GMROI'

A gross margin return on investment (GMROI) is an inventory profitability evaluation ratio that analyzes a firm's ability to turn inventory into cash above the cost of the inventory. It is calculated by dividing the gross margin by the average inventory cost and is used often in the retail industry. To illustrate:

Gross Margin Return On Investment (GMROI)

BREAKING DOWN 'Gross Margin Return On Investment - GMROI'

Gross margin return on investment is also know as the gross margin return on inventory investment (GMROII).

The gross margin is calculated by subtracting a company's cost of goods sold (COGS) from its revenue. The difference is then divided by its revenue. The average inventory is calculated by summing the ending inventory over a specified period and then dividing the sum by the number of periods.

Interpretation

The GMROI is a useful measure as it helps the investor, or management, see the average amount that the inventory returns above its cost. A ratio higher than 1 means the firm is selling the merchandise for more than what it costs the firm to acquire it. The opposite is true for a ratio below 1.

Gross Margin Return on Investment Examples

For example, assume luxury retail company ABC has total revenue of $100 million and COGS of $35 million at the end of the current fiscal year. Therefore, the company has a gross margin of 65% and retains 65 cents for each dollar of revenue it has generated. The gross margin may also be stated in dollar terms rather than in percentage terms. At the end of the fiscal year, the company has an average inventory cost of $20 million. This firm's GMROI is 3.25, or $65 million / $20 million, which means it earns revenues of 325% of costs. Therefore, company ABC is selling the merchandise for more than its acquisition cost.

Assume luxury retail company XYZ is a competitor to company ABC and has total revenue of $80 million and COGS of $65 million. Consequently, the company has a gross margin of $15 million, or 18.75 cents for each dollar of revenue it has generated. The company has an average inventory cost of $20 million. Company XYZ has a GMROI of 0.75, or $15 million/ $20 million. Therefore, it earns revenues of 75% of its costs and has an unfavorable GMROI. Additionally, company XYZ is selling the merchandise for less than its acquisition cost and is operating at a loss. In comparison to company XYZ, company ABC may not be a favorable investment based on the GMROI.

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