Go-Around

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DEFINITION of 'Go-Around'

A strategy used by the Federal Reserve to receive the highest return on securities. The Federal Reserve solicits bids/offers from the primary dealers to receive the best deal whether it be for buying, selling, reversals or repurchase agreements.

BREAKING DOWN 'Go-Around'

This strategy applies to all forms of U.S. Treasury Bills, Treasury Bonds, etc. In soliciting to the primary dealers (institutions that are permitted to deal new issues of government bonds), the Federal Reserve System is able to obtain the highest possible returns.

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