Going Public

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DEFINITION of 'Going Public'

The process of selling shares that were formerly privately held to new investors for the first time. Otherwise known as an initial public offering (IPO).

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Going Public'

When a company "goes public," it is the first time the general public has the ability to buy shares.

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