Gold Reserve Act Of 1934

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DEFINITION of 'Gold Reserve Act Of 1934'

An act that took away title to all gold and gold certificates that were held by the Federal Reserve Bank. The Gold Reserve Act of 1934 made the trade and possession of gold a criminal offense for the citizens of the U.S. Sole title of this gold was given to the U.S. Treasury. It was not until 1975 that Americans could again own or trade gold.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Gold Reserve Act Of 1934'

The act also fixed the weight of the dollar at 15.715 grains of nine-tenths fine gold. By fixing the dollar at that amount, the dollar was devalued from $20.67 per troy ounce to $35 per troy ounce. By doing this, the Treasury saw the value of their gold holdings increase by $2.81 billion overnight.

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