Good This Week - GTW

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DEFINITION of 'Good This Week - GTW'

A market order that is only valid in the week of its placement. If the order is not filled during the week of issue, it will be canceled. A GTW order is only active for the current week, meaning it will not last seven days from when it was placed.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Good This Week - GTW'

The duration of the order allows the investor to set a bid or an ask in a desired time frame. For example, let's say it is currently Tuesday and news that will affect a company's stock will be released the coming Monday. If an investor wishes to buy or sell the stock anytime before the news is released, he or she may place a GTW order to buy or sell these shares before the news arrives.The order will be good until the end of Friday, but will become invalid for Monday's news release.

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