Goodwill

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What is 'Goodwill'

Goodwill is an intangible asset that arises as a result of the acquisition of one company by another for a premium value. The value of a company’s brand name, solid customer base, good customer relations, good employee relations and any patents or proprietary technology represent goodwill. Goodwill is considered an intangible asset because it is not a physical asset like buildings or equipment. The goodwill account can be found in the assets portion of a company's balance sheet.

BREAKING DOWN 'Goodwill'

The value of goodwill typically arises in an acquisition when one company is purchased by another company. The amount the acquiring company pays for the target company over the target’s book value usually accounts for the value of the target’s goodwill. If the acquiring company pays less than the target’s book value, it gains “negative goodwill,” meaning that it purchased the company at a bargain in a distress sale.

Goodwill is difficult to price, but it does make a company more valuable. For example, a company like Coca-Cola (who has been around for decades, makes a wildly popular product based on a secret formula and is generally positively perceived by the public), would have a lot of goodwill. A competitor (a small, regional soda company that has only been in business for five years, has a small customer base, specializes in unusual soda flavors and recently faced a scandal over a contaminated batch of soda), would have far less goodwill, or even negative goodwill.

Because the components that make up goodwill have subjective values, there is a substantial risk that a company could overvalue goodwill in an acquisition. This overvaluation would be bad news for shareholders of the acquiring company, since they would likely see their share values drop when the company later has to write down goodwill. In fact, this happened in the AOL-Time Warner merger of 2001.

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RELATED FAQS
  1. Is goodwill considered a form of capital asset?

    Learn more about capital assets of a business, and understand why goodwill is an intangible asset that is classified as a ... Read Answer >>
  2. How does goodwill increase a company's value?

    Learn about the basics of goodwill in the business world, what positive effects it can have on a company's overall value ... Read Answer >>
  3. What are the primary goodwill accounting rules to be aware of?

    Learn the basics of how goodwill is acquired and tested for impairment, as well as the FASB rule change allowing for the ... Read Answer >>
  4. When and why does goodwill impairment occur?

    Understand what the goodwill of an asset is and how it's created. Learn how the goodwill of an asset can be impaired and ... Read Answer >>
  5. How is a goodwill impairment recorded on a company's financial statements?

    Learn about goodwill, how it's created and how it becomes impaired. Understand how goodwill impairment is recorded on a company's ... Read Answer >>
  6. What is the difference between goodwill and tangible assets?

    Find out about tangible and intangible assets, and understand how intangible assets, such as goodwill, do not take physical ... Read Answer >>
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