Gordon Gekko


DEFINITION of 'Gordon Gekko'

A fictional character who played the villain in the popular 1980s Oliver Stone movie Wall Street. Gekko's character, a ruthless and wildly wealthy investor and corporate raider, has become a cultural symbol for greed, as epitomized by the famous Wall Street quote, "Greed . . . is good." For his portrayal of Gekko's character, Michael Douglas won an Oscar.

BREAKING DOWN 'Gordon Gekko'

Gekko's character was not specifically based on any real-life person, but is said to have been loosely modeled on junk-bond king Michael Milken, who went to prison on racketeering and fraud charges. Gekko's greed monologue is said to be based on a real-life commencement speech Ivan Boesky gave at the University of California, Berkeley, in 1986.

  1. Racketeering

    A fraudulent service built to serve a problem that wouldn't otherwise ...
  2. Corporate Raider

    An investor who buys a large number of shares in a corporation ...
  3. Junk Bond

    A colloquial term for a high-yield or non-investment grade bond. ...
  4. Michael Milken

    As an executive at investment bank Drexel Burnham Lambert Inc. ...
  5. Wall Street

    1. A street in lower Manhattan that is the original home of the ...
  6. Money Laundering

    Money laundering is the process of creating the appearance that ...
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