Gordon Growth Model

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DEFINITION of 'Gordon Growth Model'

A model for determining the intrinsic value of a stock, based on a future series of dividends that grow at a constant rate. Given a dividend per share that is payable in one year, and the assumption that the dividend grows at a constant rate in perpetuity, the model solves for the present value of the infinite series of future dividends.

 

Gordon Growth Model

Where:
D = Expected dividend per share one year from now
k = Required rate of return for equity investor
G = Growth rate in dividends (in perpetuity)

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Gordon Growth Model'

Because the model simplistically assumes a constant growth rate, it is generally only used for mature companies (or broad market indices) with low to moderate growth rates.

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    The Gordon growth model is not more widely used because it relies on many assumptions that are hard to predict. The Gordon ... Read Full Answer >>
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