Government Accounting Standards Board - GASB

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DEFINITION of 'Government Accounting Standards Board - GASB'

An organization whose main purpose is to improve and create accounting reporting standards or generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP). These standards make it easier for users to understand and use the financial records of both state and local governments. The Government Accounting Standards Board (GASB) is funded and monitored by the Financial Accounting Foundation (FAF).

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Government Accounting Standards Board - GASB'

While the state and local governments follow the standards created by the GASB, the federal government reports according to the standards set by the Federal Accounting Standards Board (FASB).

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