Government Depository

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DEFINITION of 'Government Depository'

Libraries through the United States and its territories where federal publications and other information products are made available for free public use. In addition to the publications, trained librarians are available to assist in their use. Columbia University has been a depository for U.S. Federal documents since 1882, and is a microfiche depository for New York State documents, 1983-1994.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Government Depository'

A related concept is a bank depository, which can refer to a bank organized in the U.S. that provides all the stock transfer and agency services in connection with a depository receipt program. This function includes arranging for a custodian to accept deposits of ordinary shares, issuing the negotiable receipts that back up the shares, maintaining the register of holders to reflect all transfers and exchanges, and distributing dividends in U.S. dollars.

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