Government Grant

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DEFINITION of 'Government Grant'

A financial award given by the federal, state or local government to an eligible grantee. Government grants are not expected to be repaid by the recipient. Grants do not include technical assistance or other forms of financial assistance such as a loan or loan guarantee, an interest rate subsidy, direct appropriation or revenue sharing. There is typically a lengthy application process to qualify and be approved for a government grant. Most recipients are required to provide periodic reports on their grant project's progress.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Government Grant'

The federal government provides grants for a wide range of projects and businesses that serve public groups. Over 26 federal agencies administer more than 1,000 grant programs annually to provide funding for the arts, educational institutions, agricultural projects and much more.

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