Government Investment Unit - Indonesia

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DEFINITION of 'Government Investment Unit - Indonesia'

A sovereign wealth fund established in Indonesia and managed by the Ministry of Finance. The fund seeks to create macroeconomic stability and help promote economic growth by investing in a wide array of investment types, including equity, debt and by directly investing in the economies of foreign countries.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Government Investment Unit - Indonesia'

The Government Investment Unit was established in 2006. Unlike the sovereign wealth funds of many other countries it is not dependent on commodities as a funding source. The fund is not independent and works closely with the Indonesian government, creating separate funds to handle infrastructure and environmentally-related projects.

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