Grantee

DEFINITION of 'Grantee'

The recipient of some type of property. In its most literal sense, a grantee is the recipient of a grant, a sum of money intended to fund a specific undertaking (like a college education or a research project). In real estate, the grantee is the recipient of a property - the person who will be taking title, as named in the the legal document used to transfer the real estate. The person who is relinquishing the property is called the grantor.


BREAKING DOWN 'Grantee'

A county grantor-grantee index provides a record of property transfers showing who released ownership of a property and who took ownership, as well as the type of document used to transfer ownership (e.g., quitclaim deed, trust deed, tax lien, etc.).

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