The Great Recession

Definition of 'The Great Recession'


The sharp decline in economic activity during the late 2000s, which is generally considered the largest downturn since the Great Depression. The term “Great Recession” applies to both the U.S. recession – officially lasting from December 2007 to June 2009 – and the ensuing global recession in 2009. The economic slump began when the U.S. housing market went from boom to bust and large amounts of mortgage-backed securities and derivatives lost significant value.

Investopedia explains 'The Great Recession'


During the American housing boom of the mid-2000s, financial institutions began marketing mortgage-backed securities (MBSs) and sophisticated derivative products at unprecedented levels. When the real estate market collapsed in 2007, these securities declined precipitously in value, jeopardizing the solvency of over-leveraged banks and financial institutions in the U.S. and Europe.

Although the global economy was already feeling the grip of a credit crisis that had been unfolding since 2007, things came to a head a year later with the bankruptcy of Lehman Brothers, the country’s fourth-largest investment bank, in September 2008. The contagion quickly spread to other economies around the world, most notably in Europe. As a result of the Great Recession, the United States alone shed more than 7.5 million jobs, causing its unemployment rate to double. Further, American households lost roughly $16 trillion of net worth as a result of the stock market plunge.

The aggressive policies of the Federal Reserve and other central banks - though not without criticism - are widely credited with preventing even greater damage to the global economy. For example, the Fed lowered a key interest rate to nearly zero in order to promote liquidity and – in an unprecedented move – provided banks with a staggering $7.7 trillion of emergency loans.



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