Gross Expense Ratio - GER

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DEFINITION of 'Gross Expense Ratio - GER'

The total percentage of a mutual fund's assets that are devoted to running the fund. The gross expense ratio (GER) is exclusive of any waiver of fees or expense reimbursements. Likewise, it does not include "outside" expenses, like brokerage costs for trading the portfolio. These and other costs are reported in a Statement of Additional Information (SAI) that is sent to the SEC.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Gross Expense Ratio - GER'

The GER is important because it more directly correlates to the fund's performance than the plain expense ratio does. For example, if a fund has an expense ratio of 2% and a GER of 3%, it is readily apparent that 1% of the fund's assets were used to waive fees, reimburse expenses or provide other rebates not included in the expense ratio. This is important because such rebates and reimbursements may or may not continue in the future. Prudent investors will want to examine both figures and compare them to like funds before investing.

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