Gross Income Multiplier

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DEFINITION of 'Gross Income Multiplier'

A rough measure of the value of an investment property that is obtained by dividing the property's sale price by its gross annual rental income. GIM is used in valuing commercial real estate, such as shopping centers and apartment complexes, but is limited in that it does not consider the cost of factors such as utilities, taxes, maintenance and vacancies. Other, more detailed methods commonly used to value commercial properties include capitalization rate (cap rate) and the discounted cash flow method.







INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Gross Income Multiplier'

The gross income multiplier can be used to roughly determine whether the asking price of a property is a good deal. Multiplying the GIM by the property's gross annual income yields the property's value, or what it should be selling for.

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