Gross Lease

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DEFINITION

A type of commercial lease where the landlord pays for the building's property taxes, insurance and maintenance. A gross lease can be modified in a number of ways to best meet the needs of a particular building's tenants (for example, a gross lease may or may not require the tenant to pay utility bills).

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS

The opposite of a gross lease is a net lease. Under a net lease, the tenant is responsible for some of the additional costs associated with the property. There are three types of net leases: single net, double net and triple net. Under a single net lease, the tenant pays rent plus property taxes. Under a double net lease, the tenant pays rent plus property taxes and insurance. Under a triple net lease, the tenant pays for rent plus property taxes, insurance and maintenance.


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