Gross Merchandise Value

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DEFINITION of 'Gross Merchandise Value'

The total value of merchandise sold over a given period of time through a customer to customer exchange site. It is a measure of the growth of the business, or use of the site to sell merchandise owned by others.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Gross Merchandise Value'

Gross merchandise value is one element of an e-commerce site's performance, since the revenue of the business will be a function of gross merchandise sold and fees charged. It is most useful as a comparative measure over time, such as current quarter value versus previous quarter value.

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