Gross Rate Of Return

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DEFINITION of 'Gross Rate Of Return'

The total rate of return on an investment before the deduction of any fees or expenses. The gross rate of return is quoted over a specific period of time, such as a month, quarter or year. It is often quoted as the rate of return on an investment in advertising flyers and commercials.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Gross Rate Of Return'

The gross rate of return on an investment can be substantially different than the rate of return that is realized after expenses. For example, the gross return realized on a mutual fund that charges a 5.75% sales charge will be very different than the return realized after the charge has been deducted. Mutual fund companies are therefore required to publish or provide both returns to investors for this reason.

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