Gross Sales

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DEFINITION of 'Gross Sales'

A measure of overall sales that isn't adjusted for customer discounts or returns, calculated simply by adding all sales invoices, and not including operating expenses, cost of goods sold, payment of taxes, or any other charge.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Gross Sales'

Gross sales is usually an important measure for those companies in the consumer retail industry. It measures the amount of product that a company sells relative to its competitors, and can also reflect consumer spending habits.

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