Group of Ten - G10

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DEFINITION of 'Group of Ten - G10'

Eleven industrialized nations that meet on an annual basis to consult each other, debate and cooperate on international financial matters. The member countries are: France, Germany, Belgium, Italy, Japan, the Netherlands, Sweden, the United Kingdom, the United States and Canada, with Switzerland playing a minor role.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Group of Ten - G10'

The G10 has been criticized for its lack of responsiveness to the needs of developing countries. G10 meetings are politically charged events that often make headlines in the international press for the protests that follow them.

G10 governors usually meet every second month at the Bank for International Settlements.

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