Growth Recession

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DEFINITION of 'Growth Recession'

An expression coined by economists to describe an economy that is growing at such a slow pace that more jobs are being lost than are being added. The lack of job creation makes it "feel" as if the economy is in a recession, even though the economy is still advancing.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Growth Recession'

Many economists believe that between 2002 and 2003, the United States' economy was in a growth recession. In fact, at several points over the past 25 years the U.S. economy is said to have experienced a growth recession. That is, in spite of gains in real GDP, job growth was either non-existent or was being destroyed at a faster rate than new jobs were being added.

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