Growth Accounting

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DEFINITION of 'Growth Accounting'

A method whereby a set of economic techniques or theories are used to determine what specific factor, or factors, contributed to an economy's growth.

BREAKING DOWN 'Growth Accounting'

Growth accounting allows one to examine the different aspects of growth: production per worker, technology, and savings, to determine which factor most likely created the increase in real GDP.

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RELATED FAQS
  1. Is Argentina a developed country?

    Argentina is not a developed country. It has one of the strongest economies in South America or Central America and ranks ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. Is Brazil a developed country?

    Brazil is not a developed country. Though it has the largest economy in South America or Central America, Brazil is still ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. Are Social Security payments included in the US GDP calculation?

    Social Security payments are not included in the U.S. definition of the gross domestic product (GDP). Transfer Payments For ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What are some examples of general and administrative expenses?

    In accounting, general and administrative expenses represent the necessary costs to maintain a company's daily operations ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. How do dividend distributions affect additional paid in capital?

    Whether a dividend distribution has any effect on additional paid-in capital depends solely on what type of dividend is issued: ... Read Full Answer >>
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