Growth Accounting

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DEFINITION of 'Growth Accounting'

A method whereby a set of economic techniques or theories are used to determine what specific factor, or factors, contributed to an economy's growth.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Growth Accounting'

Growth accounting allows one to examine the different aspects of growth: production per worker, technology, and savings, to determine which factor most likely created the increase in real GDP.

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