Growth Company

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DEFINITION of 'Growth Company'

Any firm whose business generates significant positive cash flows or earnings, which increase at significantly faster rates than the overall economy. A growth company tends to have very profitable reinvestment opportunities for its own retained earnings. Thus, it typically pays little to no dividends to stockholders, opting instead to plow most or all of its profits back into its expanding business.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Growth Company'

Growth companies are most often seen in the technology industries. The quintessential example of a growth company is Google, which has grown revenues, cash flows and earnings by leaps and bounds since its initial public offering. Growth companies such as Google are expected to increase profits markedly in the future, and thus the market bids up their share prices to high valuations. This contrasts with mature companies, such as diversified utility companies, which see very stable earnings with little to no growth.

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