Growth Fund

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DEFINITION of 'Growth Fund'

A diversified portfolio of stocks that has capital appreciation as its primary goal, with little or no dividend payouts. Portfolio companies would mainly consist of companies with above-average growth in earnings that reinvest their earnings into expansion, acquisitions, and/or research and development.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Growth Fund'

Most growth funds offer higher potential capital appreciation but usually at above-average risk. Growth funds are more volatile than funds in the value and blend categories. The companies in a growth fund portfolio are in an expansion phase and they are not expected to pay dividends. Investing in growth funds requires a tolerance for risk and a holding period with a time horizon of five to 10 years.

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