Growth Industry

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DEFINITION of 'Growth Industry'

A sector of the economy experiencing a higher-than-average growth rate. Growth industries are often associated with new or pioneer industries that did not exist in the past and their growth is related to consumer demand for the new products or services offered by the firms within the industry.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Growth Industry'

If companies across an industry exhibit solid earnings and revenue figures, that industry may be showing signs that it is in its growth stage. Growth industries tend to be composed of relatively volatile and risky stocks. Often investors must be willing to accept increased risk in order to take part in the potentially large gains offered by stocks within a particular growth industry.

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