Goldman Sachs Commodity Index - GSCI


DEFINITION of 'Goldman Sachs Commodity Index - GSCI'

A composite index of commodity sector returns which represents a broadly diversified, unleveraged, long-only position in commodity futures.

BREAKING DOWN 'Goldman Sachs Commodity Index - GSCI'

Similar to the Standard & Poor's 500 index, the Goldman Sachs Commodity Index (GSCI) provides a reliable and publicly accessible investment performance benchmark. The index's components qualify for inclusion in the index based on liquidity measures and are weighted in relation to their global production levels - a characteristic which helps make the GSCI valuable as both an economic indicator and a commodities market benchmark.

  1. Prime Brokerage

    A special group of services that many brokerages give to special ...
  2. Commodity

    1. A basic good used in commerce that is interchangeable with ...
  3. Long (or Long Position)

    1. The buying of a security such as a stock, commodity or currency, ...
  4. Leverage

    1. The use of various financial instruments or borrowed capital, ...
  5. Futures

    A financial contract obligating the buyer to purchase an asset ...
  6. Benchmark

    A standard against which the performance of a security, mutual ...
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