Government-Sponsored Retirement Arrangement - GSRA

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DEFINITION of 'Government-Sponsored Retirement Arrangement - GSRA'

A Canadian retirement plan for individuals who are not employees of a local, provincial or federal government body, but who are paid for their services from public funds. This type of retirement plan is not registered with the Canadian Revenue Agency and therefore does not qualify for tax-deferred status.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Government-Sponsored Retirement Arrangement - GSRA'

Regulations on GSRAs reduce the amount that individuals receiving GSRAs are allowed to contribute to their registered retirement savings plans (RRSPs).

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