Guarantor

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DEFINITION of 'Guarantor'

A person who guarantees to pay for someone else's debt if he or she should default on a loan obligation. A guarantor acts as a co-signor of sorts, in that they pledge their own assets or services if a situation arises in which the original debtor cannot perform their obligations.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Guarantor'

Usually, people or businesses with poor or limited credit history can only get a loan if they have a guarantor. For example, an individual with a comparatively low credit score looking to obtain a line of credit to cover unforeseen expenses may be required by the bank to find a guarantor before the bank will issue them the line of credit.

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