Gunslinger

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DEFINITION

A slang term for an aggressive portfolio manager who uses high-risk investment techniques in an attempt to produce big returns. Rather than considering the long-term value of the company underlying a stock, gunslingers look at a stock's momentum and seek to benefit from short-term trades based on sharp movements in a stock's price.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS

Gunslingers are very aggressive in their trading strategies, often using leverage and margin accounts to shoot for higher returns. They may achieve some spectacular payoffs, but usually in the long run, their portfolio losses will often outweigh their gains, as is the case with most active investment strategies. Investment manager Fred Alger was considered a gunslinger in the 1960s bull market.


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