Half-Year Convention For Depreciation

What is the 'Half-Year Convention For Depreciation'

The half-year convention for depreciation is the depreciation schedule that treats all property acquired during the year as being acquired exactly in the middle of the year. This means that only half of the full-year depreciation is allowed in the first year, with the remaining balance being deducted in the final year of the depreciation schedule, or the year that the property is sold.

BREAKING DOWN 'Half-Year Convention For Depreciation'

The half-year convention for depreciation applies to both modified accelerated cost recovery systems and straight-line depreciation schedules. There is also a mid-quarter convention that is used instead of the half-year convention if the aggregate depreciable base of new property was greater than 40% and was used in service sometime during the last three months of the year.

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