Halo Effect


DEFINITION of 'Halo Effect'

The halo effect is a term used in marketing to explain the bias shown by customers towards certain products because of a favorable experience with other products made by the same manufacturer or maker. Basically, the halo effect is driven by brand equity.

The opposite of the halo effect is "cannibalization".




For example, if a customer buys product C which is made by company X, not because of the attributes or benefits of the product, but because he or she had a favorable experience with product D - another product made by company X, the purchased item is said to be prospering because of the halo effect.

A classic example of the halo effect is the relationship between the Mac notebooks and iPod. When the iPod was released, there was speculation in the market place that the sales of Apple's Mac laptops would increase, because of the success of the iPod. The belief was based on the halo effect, as customers who had a great experience with the iPod would buy a Mac simply because it is made by Apple Inc.

  1. Market Segmentation

    A marketing term referring to the aggregating of prospective ...
  2. Product Differentiation

    A marketing process that showcases the differences between products. ...
  3. Market Cannibalization

    The negative impact of a company's new product on the sales performance ...
  4. Value Proposition

    A business or marketing statement that summarizes why a consumer ...
  5. Marketing

    The activities of a company associated with buying and selling ...
  6. Harmonized Index Of Consumer Prices ...

    A list of the final costs paid by European consumers for the ...
Related Articles
  1. Fundamental Analysis

    Measuring Company Efficiency

    Three useful indicators for measuring a retail company's efficiency are its inventory turnaround times, its receivables and its collection period.
  2. Fundamental Analysis

    Analyze Cash Flow The Easy Way

    Find out how to analyze the way a company spends its money to determine whether there will be any money left for investors.
  3. Forex Education

    Understanding The Income Statement

    Learn how to use revenue and expenses, among other factors, to break down and analyze a company.
  4. Entrepreneurship

    3 Ways You Can Support Small Business Growth

    Discover a number of different options available to support small business growth, including crowdfunding campaigns and shopping locally.
  5. Investing

    What’s the Difference Between Duration & Maturity?

    We look at the meaning of two terms that often get confused, duration and maturity, to set the record straight.
  6. Professionals

    Advisors: Do You Need to Tweak Your Marketing?

    Advisors use a variety of marketing techniques to attract clients, but they don't all work. It may be time to evaluate what is, and isn't, successful.
  7. Stock Analysis

    Are the Brands Millennials Love a Good Buy?

    Millennials make up a very big — and thus important —c onsumer generation. So if they love a brand, its stock is likely to outperform, right?
  8. Entrepreneurship

    10 Ways You Can Make Money as a Blogger

    Obtain helpful information about the top 10 techniques that professional bloggers utilize to generate their incomes from blogging.
  9. Economics

    Understanding Electronic Commerce

    Electronic commerce is the buying and selling of goods and services over an electronic network.
  10. Markets

    Impacts of a 1-Star Yelp Review on a Company

    Learn how a 1-star Yelp review impacts the rating of a small business and how Yelp users interpret 1-star reviews given by customers.
  1. Is a financial advisor allowed to pay a referral fee?

    A financial advisor is allowed to pay a referral fee to a third party for soliciting clients. However, the Securities and ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. How does a long tail become profitable?

    A long tail becomes profitable because the costs to produce, market and distribute a product or service in a niche are low, ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. How do companies with a large product portfolio use BCG Analysis?

    BCG analysis is used to evaluate an organization's product portfolio in sales planning and marketing. It is specifically ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What are the similarities between product differentiation and product positioning?

    Product differentiation and product positioning are important elements in a marketing plan, and most marketing strategies ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What are the major categories of financial risk for a company?

    There are many ways to categorize a company's financial risks. One possible perspective is provided by separating financial ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. Why is product differentiation important in today's financial climate?

    Product differentiation is essential in today's financial climate. It allows the seller to contrast its own product with ... Read Full Answer >>

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Turkey

    Slang for an investment that yields disappointing results or turns out worse than expected. Failed business deals, securities ...
  2. Barefoot Pilgrim

    A slang term for an unsophisticated investor who loses all of his or her wealth by trading equities in the stock market. ...
  3. Quick Ratio

    The quick ratio is an indicator of a company’s short-term liquidity. The quick ratio measures a company’s ability to meet ...
  4. Black Tuesday

    October 29, 1929, when the DJIA fell 12% - one of the largest one-day drops in stock market history. More than 16 million ...
  5. Black Monday

    October 19, 1987, when the Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJIA) lost almost 22% in a single day. That event marked the beginning ...
  6. Monetary Policy

    Monetary policy is the actions of a central bank, currency board or other regulatory committee that determine the size and ...
Trading Center