Hard Skills

Dictionary Says

Definition of 'Hard Skills'


Specific, teachable abilities that can be defined and measured. By contrast, soft skills are less tangible and harder to quantify. Examples of hard skills include job skills like typing, writing, math, reading and the ability to use software programs; soft skills are personality-driven skills like etiquette, getting along with others, listening and engaging in small talk.

In business, hard skills most often refer to accounting and financial modeling.

Investopedia Says

Investopedia explains 'Hard Skills'


Hard and soft skills are often referred to when applying for a job. For most jobs, while the hard skills are essential to getting the interview, it's the soft skills that will land the job because employers want someone who won't just perform their job function, but will be a good personality fit for the company and make a good impression on clients.

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