Hard Asset


DEFINITION of 'Hard Asset'

A tangible and physical item or object of worth that is owned by an individual or a corporation. In currency transactions, hard assets are synonymous with currencies that the public generally has faith in, such as the U.S. dollar or the euro.

A hard asset is the opposite of an intangible item such as goodwill or a patent.


Hard assets often refer to items such as buildings, cash or other fungible assets. Hard assets are considered particularly valuable because they can be used to produce or purchase other goods or services.

When analysts calculate a company's intrinsic value, a portion of this underlying value is derived from the value of its hard assets.

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  1. What is the difference between amortization and depreciation?

    Because very few assets last forever, one of the main principles of accrual accounting requires that an asset's cost be proportionally ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. Does working capital include inventory?

    A company's working capital includes inventory, and increases in inventory make working capital increase. Working capital ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. Does working capital include salaries?

    A company accrues unpaid salaries on its balance sheet as part of accounts payable, which is a current liability account, ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. Are dividends considered an asset?

    Whether dividends paid on stock are considered an asset depends on which role you play in the investment: the issuing company ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What is a profit and loss (P&L) statement and why do companies publish them?

    A profit and loss (P&L) statement, or balance sheet, is essentially a snapshot of a company's financial activity for ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. How do dividends affect the balance sheet?

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