Hard Currency

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DEFINITION of 'Hard Currency'

A currency, usually from a highly industrialized country, that is widely accepted around the world as a form of payment for goods and services. A hard currency is expected to remain relatively stable through a short period of time, and to be highly liquid in the forex market.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Hard Currency'

Another criterion for a hard currency is that the currency must come from a politically and economically stable country. The U.S. dollar and the British pound are good examples of hard currencies.

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