Hardening

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DEFINITION of 'Hardening'

1. A term used to describe a price of commodity or futures contracts that is gradually stabilizing.



2. A futures market that is slowly advancing in prices.

BREAKING DOWN 'Hardening'

1. After a rise or fall in prices, a slow return to historically accepted levels is considered a hardening.



2. The prices of future contracts are considered to be hardening if they are increasing slowly, unlike a bulge market, in which the prices rise sharply.

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