Hard Loan

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DEFINITION of 'Hard Loan'

A foreign loan that must be paid in the currency of a nation that has stability and a reputation abroad for economic strength (a hard currency).

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Hard Loan'

For example, a loan agreement between a Brazilian company and an Argentinean company where the debt is to be paid in U.S. dollars.

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