Hawk

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DEFINITION of 'Hawk'

A policymaker or advisor who is predominantly concerned with interest rates as they relate to fiscal policy. A hawk generally favors relatively high interest rates in order to keep inflation in check. In other words, they are less concerned with economic growth than they are with recessionary pressure brought to bear by high inflation rates.

Also known as "inflation hawk."

BREAKING DOWN 'Hawk'

Although the most common use of the term "hawk" is described above, be aware that it has been used in a variety of contexts. In each case, it refers to someone who is intently focused on a particular aspect of a larger pursuit or endeavor. A budget hawk, for example, is one that believes the federal budget is of the utmost importance - just like a generic hawk (or inflation hawk) is focused on interest rates.

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